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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2022 4:48 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 6:33 am
Posts: 10513
At least police seem to be taking this pretty seriously, if the photos anything to go by :-|


Taxi driver assaulted by two thugs in early hours attack

https://www.greenocktelegraph.co.uk/new ... ur-attack/

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Image: Greenock Telegraph

A TAXI driver was brutally assaulted by two thugs on a Greenock street in an early hours attack.

The 62-year-old man was struck on the head and legs with a weapon on Nelson Street, outwith his taxi, at around 4.15am yesterday.

He was rushed to the Royal Alexandra Hospital in Paisley for treatment to injuries which are not believed to be life-threatening.

Police say the male and female suspect ran off after the incident.

Detectives are treating the incident as a serious assault and are now hunting for the duo.

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Image: Greenock Telegraph

Officers and forensics personnel carried out an examination of the scene for several hours after the incident and enquiries are ongoing.

Detective Sergeant Stuart Young of Greenock CID said: "We will be conducting door-to-door inquiries and reviewing CCTV footage.

"We're appealing for any witnesses or anyone who has any information to get in touch."

Anyone with information should call Greenock police on 101 or ring Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111.

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Image: Greenock Telegraph


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PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2022 7:37 pm 
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Location: Stamford Britains prettiest town till SKDC ruined it
Quote:
The 62-year-old man was struck on the head and legs with a weapon on Nelson Street, outwith his taxi,


I think that should be word of the day :D

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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 2:32 am 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 6:33 am
Posts: 10513
Certainly an odd use of the word 'outwith'. Normally it's quite a formal word, and only really used in Scotland, maybe in legislation etc, but not really expected in a newspaper report like that above.

Thought it might actually appear in the taxi licensing legislation, but a quick search suggests it doesn't, but it does appear in this part of the Act about boat hire licenses :-s

Civic Government (Scotland) Act 1982, section 38(11) wrote:
Where—

(a)a vessel in respect of which a boat hire licence is in force is used—

(i)within the territorial waters of the United Kingdom adjacent to Scotland; and

(ii)within any inland waters or waters specified in the licence under subsection (7)(b) above; but

(iii)outwith the area of the licensing authority which granted or last renewed the licence; and

(b)all persons carried in the vessel embark initially from places within the area of the authority,

it shall not be necessary to have in force in respect of that use of the vessel a boat hire licence granted by any other licensing authority and the conditions subject to which the licence is held shall continue to apply to such use.


I'd generally use it to refer to something geographical, eg outwith Dundee, or outwith the licensing area, so not in the sense used in the report above. But generally only in formal writing or speech, and not everyday conversations, or whatever.


Scottish Twitter users 'shocked' after discovering the word 'outwith' is only used in Scotland

https://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/scotland- ... r-22881922

The unknown 'Scotticism' was the subject of a debate between one Twitter user and her America and English friends.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2022 2:34 am 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 6:33 am
Posts: 10513
This is another reasonably common use of the word. Or, as I said, outwith Scotland, or the UK, or whatever. But don't think the likes of 'outwith the taxi' is common at all :?

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But 'firie' is definitely informal Scots for fireman :D

Or 'firies', meaning firemen, or 'the firies' meaning the fire service :-o


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