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UK cab trade debate and advice
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EU - Remain or Leave?
Remain in the EU 26%  26%  [ 10 ]
Leave the EU 74%  74%  [ 29 ]
Total votes : 39
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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 6:11 pm 
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grandad wrote:
Sussex wrote:
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will have to be a hard border in Ireland.

We don't have to have a hard border, we can keep it just as it is now.

However if the Republic wish to put a border up then that's down to them.

Explain how it will work with tarrifs and movement of people when they come in if there is no hard border?


Border controls can have three objectives

1.Check persons crossing the border for immigration purposes. In the case of the Irish border, this possible purpose has nothing to do with the EU: The EU Schengen arrangements do not apply to the British Isles, and will also not apply there in future. Instead, the UK and Ireland maintain a common travel area, which is not an arrangement under EU laws and thus would not be affected by Brexit. There will be no need for immigration checks at the Irish border after Brexit.

2.Perform security checks. Such checks were the main purpose of the then-”fortified” Irish border, and became obsolete with the Good Friday Agreement and the enhanced security cooperation on the island of Ireland. The question whether such checks are needed or not, is also not affected by Brexit.

3.Check and process goods crossing the border. Such checks are usually performed by customs. As everyone who is travelling internationally might know, almost no customs authority in the world checks all goods brought across borders. Or when did you have to open your suitcase last time you travelled into a different country (not intra-EU)? Customs require goods brought across the border commercially to be declared, registered, processed, or whatever procedure takes place, and performs risk-based spot checks on other goods.

Switzerland does not belong to the EU customs and VAT area, but is part of the Schengen Agreement. When crossing the border, people travelling undergo no systematic checks, as there is no need for immigration control. With regard to goods

certain border crossings have facilities for the declaration and processing of commercial or otherwise dutiable goods. This applies to the larger motorway crossings or crossings at larger main roads, while
other crossings are not permanently staffed, and persons are free to cross the border there without being checked, except if they carry goods which are subject to duties. Spot checks are performed nevertheless by mobile units.

As the possible purposes of border controls at the Irish border after a “hard Brexit” and those at the Irish border would be the same, the model would be very feasible for Ireland

Once in Switzerland you cannot do anything unless you are there legally.

Switzerland's border is crossed by around 2.4million people every day and it is outside the custom's union,it’s also a colossal figure for a country with a population of just 8.4million.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2018 11:07 pm 
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Explain how it will work with tarrifs and movement of people when they come in if there is no hard border?

Tariffs will work how they do now.

We have different tax rates now, different currencies now.

And free movement is not always a case of who comes in, more of a case of how easy it is for us to boot out.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 3:19 pm 
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Sussex wrote:
Quote:
Explain how it will work with tarrifs and movement of people when they come in if there is no hard border?

Tariffs will work how they do now.

We have different tax rates now, different currencies now.

And free movement is not always a case of who comes in, more of a case of how easy it is for us to boot out.

There are no tariffs on goods from the EU at the moment. under WTO rules there will be until a new trade deal is agreed.

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2018 7:17 pm 
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The imposition of tariffs on trade with the EU would increase costs for both UK importers (and hence consumers) and exporters. The average EU tariff rate is low – around 1.5%. However, at a sectoral level, the impacts would be much larger: for example, for cars and car parts the tariff rate is 10%. Since most UKbased car production is exported, and uses imported parts, the impacts would be magnified. The impacts would also be large on agriculture, where EU tariffs and quotas remain high; this would result in significant food price inflation for British consumers.

The only exceptions to this principle are that countries can choose to enter into free trade agreements and they can give preferential market access to developing countries. The UK could alleviate the impact on consumers by reducing or eliminating tariffs unilaterally – as long as this is done in a non-discriminatory way, this would be permitted under WTO rules. However, this would have significant impacts on domestic producers, especially in agriculture. In any case, increased tariff barriers would not be the most important impact. The bulk of the cost of doing business across borders comes from non-tariff barriers such as border checks, custom controls and compliance with different product standards and regulations across countries. These barriers cannot be removed unilaterally because they require trade partners to agree on a set of rules and regulations which they can both accept. While the UK is in the EU, its businesses do not have to go through border checks because they already qualify as being compliant with EU rules and regulations.

Under a hard Brexit/“WTO rules” scenario, without mutual recognition agreements for product standards, it is unlikely that UK products could enter the EU without further checks at the border. Over time, if there is divergence between UK and EU standards, UK businesses would need to produce two different product lines – one for the UK and one for the EU – which would increase costs and reduce competitiveness.
I don't think you are right Pete reading through this I think we can UNILATERALLY not impose trade tariffs which should result in the EU not imposing them on us



The impacts of non-tariff barriers would be larger for the service sector, which makes up 80% of the UK economy. Access to the single EU aviation market requires headquarters and majority shareholdings to be located within the EU so that it can have regulatory oversight on safety. UK service exporters would also suffer from the loss of ‘passporting’ rights for financial services, as well as reduced access for other service providers like legal and accountancy services.

The Centre for Economic Performance estimates that a “No Deal WTO rules only” scenario would reduce the UK’s trade with the EU by 40% over ten years. This reduced trade would mean a fall in income per head of 2.6% per year (net of the savings from no membership fees). There would also be longer-term negative effects from lower investment and slower productivity growth, which are estimated to be another 3.5% of GDP. Adopting a policy of unilateral free trade would mitigate part of these costs. But the savings from unilateral tariff cuts are estimated to be just 0.35% of GDP. The short-term disruption resulting from the sudden imposition of these WTO rules could exacerbate these negative effects.

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PostPosted: Sat Nov 24, 2018 10:11 am 
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We can't start negotiations for free trade agreements with other countries until we have left the EU, that is the rule. The Government are trying to secure a free trade agreement with the EU but there are sticking points that have to be sorted and there in lies the problem. We both have red lines. Our is that we will not allow free movement of people and the EU red line is that we can't have free movement of goods without the free movement of people so some one will have to give. However since yesterday I believe that parliament will now pass the agreement because the DUP have said that they will stop supporting the Government if it gets passed. This could well mean a vote of no confidence that the government would lose so it is in the interests of Labour to now pass the agreement thus forcing a general election, unless of course Labour don't fancy being in power.

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PostPosted: Mon Dec 10, 2018 7:23 pm 
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we aint leaving, we never were... fake and conspiracy...

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