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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 10:42 am 
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For anyone with a slow connection/steam-driven laptop like me who won't be able to load the TaxiPoint version posted by Skippy until the next Supreme Court ruling is due :-o


UK Supreme Court rules Uber drivers are workers

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-56123668

Ride hailing taxi app firm Uber must classify its drivers as workers rather than self-employed, the UK's Supreme Court has ruled.

The decision means tens of thousands of Uber drivers are set to be entitled to minimum wage and holiday pay.

The ruling could leave Uber facing a hefty compensation bill, and have wider consequences for the gig economy.

In a long-running legal battle, Uber had appealed to the Supreme Court after losing three earlier rounds.

'Massive achievement'

Former Uber drivers James Farrar and Yaseen Aslam, who originally won an employment tribunal against the ride hailing app giant in October 2016, told the BBC they were "thrilled and relieved" by the ruling.

"I think it's a massive achievement in a way that we were able to stand up against a giant," said Mr Aslam, president of the App Drivers & Couriers Union (ADCU).

"We didn't give up and we were consistent - no matter what we went through emotionally or physically or financially, we stood our ground."

Uber appealed against the employment tribunal decision but the Employment Appeal Tribunal upheld the ruling in November 2017.

The ride hailing taxi app firm then took the case to the High Court, which upheld the ruling again in December 2018.

The ruling on Friday was Uber's last appeal, as the Supreme Court is Britain's highest court, and it has the final say on legal matters.

'Drivers are struggling'

A key point in the Supreme Court's ruling is that Uber has to consider its drivers "workers" from the time they log on to the app, until they log off.

Uber drivers typically spend time waiting for people to book rides on the app. Previously, the firm had said that if drivers were found to be workers, then it would only count the time during journeys when a passenger is in the car.

"This is a win-win-win for drivers, passengers and cities. It means Uber now has the correct economic incentives not to oversupply the market with too many vehicles and too many drivers," said James Farrar, ADCU's general secretary.

"The upshot of that oversupply has been poverty, pollution and congestion."

However, questions still remain about how the new classification will work, and how it affects gig economy workers who work not only for Uber, but also for other competing apps.

Mr Aslam, who claims Uber's practices forced him to leave the trade as he couldn't make ends meet, is considering becoming a driver for the app again. But he is upset that it took so long.

"It took us six years to establish what we should have got in 2015. Someone somewhere, in the government or the regulator, massively let down these workers, many of whom are in a precarious position," he said.

Mr Farrar points out that with fares down 80% due to the pandemic, many drivers have been struggling financially and feel trapped in Uber's system.

"We're seeing many of our members earning £30 gross a day right now," he said, explaining that the self-employment grants issued by the government only cover 80% of a driver's profits, which isn't even enough to pay for their costs.

"If we had these rights today, those drivers could at least earn a minimum wage to live on."


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 10:44 am 
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Joined: Wed May 16, 2012 5:33 am
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Sky's version. Like the BBC's report, it's mostly quotes from 'stakeholders' rather than about the actual case. But maybe there's not actually much in the case itself other than the Supreme Court agreeing with the lower court :idea:


Uber loses Supreme Court battle on drivers' rights in gig economy test

https://news.sky.com/story/uber-loses-s ... t-12222531

Uber has lost its battle in the Supreme Court over drivers' rights - a decision that could have far-reaching implications for millions of people in the gig economy.

Following a lengthy legal fight, the UK's highest court ruled against the taxi app firm and concluded drivers should be classed as workers, not independent third-party contractors, which means they are entitled to basic employment protections, including minimum wage and holiday pay.

The victory, described by the GMB union as "historic", paves the way for drivers to claim compensation running into thousands of pounds.

Yaseen Aslam, co-lead claimant and App Drivers & Couriers Union president said: "I am overjoyed and greatly relieved by this decision which will bring relief to so many workers in the gig economy who so desperately need it."

Co-lead claimant and the union's general secretary James Farrar said: "This ruling will fundamentally re-order the gig economy and bring an end to rife exploitation of workers by means of algorithmic and contract trickery.

"Uber drivers are cruelly sold a false dream of endless flexibility and entrepreneurial freedom.
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"The reality has been illegally low pay, dangerously long hours and intense digital surveillance.

"I am delighted that workers at last have some remedy because of this ruling, but the government must urgently strengthen the law so that gig workers may also have access to sick pay and protection from unfair dismissal."

Nigel Mackay, a partner in the employment team at law firm Leigh Day, which represented some of the Uber drivers involved in the case, said: "Our clients have been fighting for workers' rights for many years, so we are delighted that the end is finally in sight.

"Already an employment tribunal, the Employment Appeal Tribunal and the Court of Appeal have ruled that Uber drivers are entitled to workers' rights, and now the Supreme Court has come to the same conclusion.

"Uber has consistently suggested that the rulings only affect two drivers, but Leigh Day will be claiming compensation on behalf of the thousands of drivers who have joined its claim.

"For many of the drivers that Leigh Day represents, the claims could be worth thousands of pounds in compensation."

Mick Rix, GMB national officer, said: "This has been a gruelling four-year legal battle for our members - but it's ended in a historic win.

"The Supreme Court has upheld the decision of three previous courts, backing up what GMB has said all along; Uber drivers are workers and entitled to breaks, holiday pay and minimum wage.

"Uber must now stop wasting time and money pursuing lost legal causes and do what's right by the drivers who prop up its empire.

"GMB will now consult with our Uber driver members over their forthcoming compensation claim."

Responding to the judgment, Uber's Jamie Heywood said: "We respect the court's decision which focussed on a small number of drivers who used the Uber app in 2016.

"Since then we have made some significant changes to our business, guided by drivers every step of the way.

"These include giving even more control over how they earn and providing new protections like free insurance in case of sickness or injury.

"We are committed to doing more and will now consult with every active driver across the UK to understand the changes they want to see.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 19, 2021 12:17 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 01, 2006 10:47 pm
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Location: Stamford Britains prettiest town till SKDC ruined it
and in another article about VAT but related

Quote:
When self-employed contractors carry out the service booked on a platform such as Uber, Airbnb or Task Rabbit, they often individually fall below the £85,000 VAT registration threshold.

But if they were employees and the service was provided by the platform company, consumers would have to pay the tax.

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